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ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 TURBO Review

 

ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 TURBO Review

ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 TURBO Review

 

1 – Overview

This GTX 1080 TURBO is the simplest GTX 1080 I tested. By simplest, I mean the graphics card comes with a simple VGA cooler (nothing to see with the GTX 1080 Strix!), no factory overclocking and a minimal bundle.

The GTX 1080 TURBO is powered by a Pascal GP104 GPU clocked at 1607MHz (base clock) and 1733MHz (boost clock). Both clock speeds are the reference ones, no out of the box overclocking. The card has 8GB of GDDR5X graphics memory clocked at 10010MHz like NVIDIA reference model.

ASUS GTX 1080 TURBO homepage can be found HERE.

2 – Gallery

The bundle is minimal: the GTX 1080, a user’s guide, a CDROM with drivers + utilities and an invite code for World Warships:

ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 TURBO

ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 TURBO


The GTX 1080 TURBO:

ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 TURBO

ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 TURBO

ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 TURBO


No backplate… not enough expensive to deserve a backplate!


ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 TURBO

The GTX 1080 TURBO comes with one 8-pin power connector: the total power draw can reach 225W (150W + 75W). The TDP of the reference GTX 1080 is 180W. The diameter of the fan: 65mm.


ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 TURBO

Two DisplayPort 1.4, two HDMI 2.0 and one DVI connectors are present.


ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 TURBO

A LED is available to indicate a good power supply (white color=OK, red color=ERROR).


ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 TURBO

The GTX 1080 Turbo versus GTX 1080 Strix.


ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 TURBO

3 – GPU Data


ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 TURBO + GPU Caps Viewer
ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 TURBO + GPU Shark

4 – Benchmarks

Testbed configuration:
– CPU: Intel Core i5 6600K @ 3.5GHz
– Motherboard: ASUS Z170 Pro Gaming
– Memory: 8GB DDR4 Corsair Vengeance LPX @ 2666MHz
– PSU: Corsair AX860i
– Software: Windows 10 64-bit + NVIDIA R376.09

4.1 – 3DMark Sky Diver

29024 – ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 Strix – R368.51
28328 – ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 TURBO – R376.09
26828 – EVGA GeForce GTX 1070 FTW – R376.09
25134 – ASUS GeForce GTX 980 Ti – R353.06
23038 – ASUS GeForce GTX 980 Strix – R344.75
21964 – MSI Radeon R9 290X Gaming – Catalyst 14.9 WHQL
21811 – Gainward GeForce GTX 970 Phantom – R344.75
20274 – EVGA GeForce GTX 780 – R344.75
17570 – MSI Radeon HD 7970 – Catalyst 14.9 WHQL
17533 – EVGA GeForce GTX 680 – R344.75

4.2 – 3DMark Fire Strike

Fire Strike is a Direct3D 11 benchmark for high-performance gaming PCs with serious graphics cards.


3DMark Fire Strike

15583 – ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 Strix – R368.51
14810 – ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 TURBO – R376.09
13438 – EVGA GeForce GTX 1070 FTW – R376.09
12514 – ASUS GeForce GTX 980 Ti – R353.06
10574 – ASUS GeForce GTX 980 Strix – R344.75
9382 – MSI Radeon R9 290X Gaming – Catalyst 14.9 WHQL
8870 – MSI GTX 970 CLASSIC 4GD5T OC – R344.75
8203 – EVGA GeForce GTX 780 – R344.75
6572 – MSI Radeon HD 7970 – Catalyst 14.9 WHQL
6399 – ASUS Strix GTX 960 DC2 OC 4GB – R353.06
6235 – EVGA GeForce GTX 680 – R344.75

4.3 – 3DMark Fire Strike Ultra

5125 (Graphics score: 5330) – ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 Strix – R368.51
4865 – ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 TURBO – R376.09
4244 – EVGA GeForce GTX 1070 FTW – R376.09
2617 (Graphics score: 2592) – MSI GTX 970 CLASSIC 4GD5T OC – R368.69
2178 (Graphics score: 2134) – EVGA GeForce GTX 780 – R368.69

4.4 – 3DMark Time Spy

6393 (Graphics score: 7449) – ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 Strix – R372.54
6162 – ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 TURBO – R376.09
5358 – EVGA GeForce GTX 1070 FTW – R376.09
4177 (Graphics score: 4274) – EVGA GeForce GTX 1060 SC – R368.81
3658 (Graphics score: 3640) – MSI Radeon RX 470 Gaming X – Crimson 16.8.2
3410 (Graphics score: 3382) – MSI GTX 970 CLASSIC 4GD5T OC – R368.69

4.5 – FurMark 1.18

FurMark is an OpenGL 2 benchmark that renders a furry donut. This benchmark is known for its extreme GPU workload.


FurMark
Settings: Preset:1080 (1920×1080)

7151 points (119 FPS) – ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 Strix – R368.51
7063 points (118 FPS) – ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 TURBO – R376.09
6233 points (103 FPS) – ASUS GeForce GTX 980 Ti – R353.06
6143 points (102 FPS) – EVGA GeForce GTX 1070 FTW – R376.09
4660 points (77 FPS) – ASUS GeForce GTX 980 Strix – R344.75
4592 points (76 FPS) – MSI Radeon R9 290X Gaming – Catalyst 14.9 WHQL
4050 points (67 FPS) – EVGA GeForce GTX 780 – R344.75
3335 points (55 FPS) – MSI GTX 970 CLASSIC 4GD5T OC – R344.75
2951 points (49 FPS) – MSI Radeon HD 7970 – Catalyst 14.9 WHQL
2733 points (45 FPS) – EVGA GeForce GTX 680 – R344.75
2566 points (42 FPS) – ASUS Strix GTX 960 DC2 OC 4GB – R353.06

Settings: Preset:2160 (3840×2160)

2715 points (45 FPS) – ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 Strix – R368.51
2624 points (44 FPS) – ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 TURBO – R376.09
2201 points (37 FPS) – EVGA GeForce GTX 1070 FTW – R376.09
1385 points (23 FPS) – EVGA GeForce GTX 780 – R368.69
1339 points (22 FPS) – MSI GTX 970 CLASSIC 4GD5T OC – R368.69

4.6 – Resident Evil 6 Benchmark

Resident Evil 6 (RE6) is a Direct3D 9 benchmark. RE6 benchmark can be downloaded from this page.


Resident Evil 6
Settings: Resolution: 1920 x 1080, anti-aliasing: FXAA3HQ, all params to high.

21410 points – ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 Strix – R372.54
21295 points – ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 TURBO – R376.09
20869 points – EVGA GeForce GTX 1070 FTW ACX3.0 – R376.09
18527 points – EVGA GeForce GTX 1060 SC – R372.54
16332 points – MSI GTX 970 Classic – R353.06
14522 points – MSI Radeon R9 290X Gaming 4GB – Crimson 16.8.2
13789 points – MSI Radeon RX 470 Gaming X 8GB – Crimson 16.8.2
13405 points – EVGA GTX 780 – R353.06
11935 points – ASUS Strix GTX 960 DC2 OC 4GB – R353.06
11442 points – EVGA GTX 680 – R353.06
8794 points – MSI GTX 660 Hawk – R353.06
5714 points – ASUS GTX 750 + R353.06
4495 points – ASUS G551Jw notebook w/ GTX 960M 4GB + R353.06

4.7 – Unigine Valley 1.0

Unigine Valley is a Direct3D/OpenGL benchmark from the same dev team than Unigine Heaven. More information can be found HERE and HERE.


Unigine Valley
Settings: Extreme HD (Direct3D 11, 1920×1080 fullscreen, 8X MSAA)

102.0 FPS, Score: 4269 – ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 Strix – R372.54
101.0 FPS, Score: 4227 – ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 TURBO – R376.09
90.5 FPS, Score: 3788 – EVGA GeForce GTX 1070 FTW ACX3.0 – R376.09
86.1 FPS, Score: 3602 – ASUS GeForce GTX 980 Ti – R353.06
68.0 FPS, Score: 2846 – EVGA GeForce GTX 1060 SC – R372.54
67.8 FPS, Score: 2837 – ASUS GeForce GTX 980 Strix – R344.75
63.3 FPS, Score: 2648 – MSI Radeon R9 290X Gaming – Crimson 16.8.2
58.7 FPS, Score: 2457 – Gainward GeForce GTX 970 Phantom – R344.75
57.8 FPS, Score: 2418 – EVGA GeForce GTX 780 – R344.75
56.0 FPS, Score: 2344 – MSI GTX 970 CLASSIC 4GD5T OC – R344.75
46.4 FPS, Score: 1942 – MSI Radeon RX 470 Gaming X 8GB – Crimson 16.8.2
42.9 FPS, Score: 1796 – EVGA GeForce GTX 680 – R344.75
39.9 FPS, Score: 1668 – MSI Radeon HD 7970 – Catalyst 14.9 WHQL
35.8 FPS, Score: 1500 – ASUS Strix GTX 960 DC2 OC 4GB – R353.06
34.6 FPS, Score: 1446 – EVGA GeForce GTX 580 – R344.75
32.4 FPS, Score: 1358 – MSI GTX 660 Hawk – R353.06
29.3 FPS, Score: 1224 – Sapphire Radeon HD 6970 – Catalyst 14.9 WHQL
25.6 FPS, Score: 1071 – EVGA GeForce GTX 480 – R344.75
19.4 FPS, Score: 812 – ASUS GeForce GTX 750 – R344.75
16.2 FPS, Score: 679 – ASUS Radeon HD 7770 DC – Catalyst 14.9 WHQL

5 – Burn-in Test

Testbed configuration:
– CPU: Intel Core i5 6600K @ 3.5GHz
– Motherboard: ASUS Z170 Pro Gaming
– Memory: 8GB DDR4 Corsair Vengeance LPX @ 2666MHz
– PSU: Corsair AX860i
– Software: Windows 10 64-bit + NVIDIA R376.09

At idle state, the total power consumption of the testbed is 38W. The GPU temperature is 30°C. The VGA cooler is barely audible but we can hear it (open case).

To stress test the GTX 1080 TURBO, I’m going to use the latest FurMark 1.18.2. A resolution of 1024×768 is enough to stress test the graphics card.

The first stress test is done with the default power target: 100%TDP. After 5 minutes, the total power consumption of the testbed was 233W and the GPU temperature was 79°C.

Before starting the second stress test, I quickly launched MSI Afterburner and set the power target to the maximal value. For this GTX 1080 TURBO, the max value is 120%TDP. Now results are a bit different: the total power consumption jumped to 267W and the GPU temperature reached 83°C. The VGA cooler was noisy…


ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 TURBO - FurMark stress test

An approximation of the graphics card power consumption is:

P = (267 – 38 – 20) x 0.9
P = 188W @ 120%TDP

where 0.9 the the power efficiency factor of the Corsair AX860i PSU, and 20W is the additional power draw of the CPU.

Thermal Imaging

Idle state


ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 TURBO - Thermal imaging - idle state

Load state


ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 TURBO - Thermal imaging - stress test

6 – Conclusion

This GTX 1080 TURBO is a basic GTX 1080. The performances are good and in the expected range for a GTX 1080 but that’s all. The card has a cheap VGA cooler: at idle the noise is barely audible (good!) but under heavy load, the cooler is noisy (not good!!). And the 0dB fan technology we can find on other models? Not present… This kind of VGA cooler should not be there: it’s a GTX 1080 and a high-end graphics card based on a GP104 GPU deserves a decent VGA cooler.

The GPU temperature at idle state is good (30°C) but can exceed 80°C on load. There is no backplate for mechanical protection and heat dissipation. Compared to other models like the GTX 1080 Strix, this card is cheaper. So if you really need a GTX 1080 for its graphics performances but you don’t want to spend too much money, this is your card.

Now if you hesitate, maybe a graphics card like the EVGA GTX 1070 FTW would be a better choice: very good performances, noiseless and cheaper…


ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 TURBO
Thanks to Internex for this ASUS GTX 1080 Turbo!

NVIDIA Launches Quadro M6000 with 24GB of Graphics Memory

NVIDIA Launches Quadro M6000 with 24GB of Graphics Memory

NVIDIA Launches Quadro M6000 with 24GB of Graphics Memory

NVIDIA has launched a new version of the Quadro M6000, the high-end Quadro for workstations and profesional applications. This new version of the Quadro M6000 comes with 24GB of GDDR5 memory, twice as much GPU memory as the previous M6000 (launched in 2015).

The new Quadro M6000 24GB is based on a full GM200 GPU (Maxwell architecture) with 3072 CUDA cores.

You can have one of those graphics cards for around USD $5000

The World’s Most Powerful Workstation Graphics Card.

The NVIDIA M6000 24GB is the world’s most powerful workstation graphics card, giving you the extreme performance and on-board memory to take on your biggest visualization challenges. Artists, animators, and editors can now work in real-time on their most complex projects with multiple layers and advanced effects. Plus, product designers and engineers don’t have to compromise on model complexity or image quality when working on large assemblies; they can now integrate interactive, physically based rendering and simulation to evaluate product design and functionality in entirely new ways. Geophysicists can also accelerate their time-to-insight in seismic exploration by holding substantially larger data sets in memory for faster processing and analysis.

Quadro cards are certified with a broad range of sophisticated professional applications, tested by leading workstation manufacturers, and backed by a global team of support specialists. This gives you the peace of mind to focus on doing your best work. Whether you’re developing revolutionary products or telling spectacularly vivid visual stories, Quadro gives you the performance to do it brilliantly

NVIDIA Quadro M6000 24GB specifications

NVIDIA Quadro homepage is available HERE.

NVIDIA just published an article that shows the advantages of their new beast:

At Sony Pictures Imageworks, we regularly push the limits of our ability to display and interact with very complex scenes,” said Erik Strauss, executive director of software development at Sony Pictures Imageworks. “The Quadro M6000 24GB gives us a 10x performance boost with the throughput necessary to display these types of large scenes smoothly and interactively.

Read more: How Industry Giants Streamline Their Design Workflows.


NVIDIA Quadro M6000 with 24GB of Graphics Memory
NVIDIA Quadro M6000 with 24GB of Graphics Memory

Unravel review: Eyes full of candy, head full of yarn

Unravel review: Eyes full of candy, head full of yarn

Unravel review: Eyes full of candy, head full of yarn

Netflix makes secret “test” films. I discovered this a few years ago through InstantWatcher, which aggregates all films added to Netflix on any given day. Here, for your entertainment, is “Example Show,” presumably used by Netflix to test some aspect of its TV streaming.

For those who can’t watch: It’s nonsense. First, a twenty second time-lapse of a random building. Then a full minute of a bubbling fountain—a medium shot followed by a close-up. A hand reaches in and touches the water. Skipping forward, there are shots of trains going by, a shot of the moon, a man dribbling a soccer ball… you get the idea.

There’s no substance. “Example Show” is ten minutes of stitched-together B-roll—vaguely pleasant, inoffensive, and ultimately empty of meaning.

Much the same could be said of Unravel.

The ties that bind

Sometimes Unravel is cute. Sometimes it’s beautiful. Most of the time it’s a humdrum puzzle-platformer.

Unravel

You play as Yarny, a knitted doll who decides he’s tired of living in grandma’s boring ol’ house and goes on an adventure. Unfortunately for Yarny, he accidentally snagged his intestines on something on his way out the window. Thus he is constantly hemorrhaging a trail of red thread wherever he goes.

The same dark magic that brought Yarny to life also allows him to replenish his yarn supply at various checkpoints, though. This is the “puzzle” part of this puzzle platformer. You need to make it to the next checkpoint without using an arbitrary amount of thread.

What it actually means: A lot of tedious backtracking. Yarny uses his guts for everything—building bridges, operating pulleys, and (most often) swinging off pegs like Tarzan with a horrific hernia.

Fun fact: A human’s intestines are approximately twenty feet long.

Unravel

Anyway, many of these actions require Yarny to tie a knot in his slowly-dwindling intestines—say, to push a can over a rock so Yarny can stand on it and reach a higher ledge. Rarely are these “puzzles” at all difficult to figure out.

What is difficult is remaining patient when the game then forces you to go back and untie all those damn knots because otherwise you can’t make it to the checkpoint. Try not to lose your temper when you’re mere centimeters from the next yarn-granting checkpoint and see an emaciated Yarny start pulling at his stomach, wordlessly whining that he can’t go even one more step unless you go back and undo a knot you foolishly left tied, or go over that [random decorative element] instead of underneath it.

And I do mean random. Unravel is broken up into ten stages, each with its own theme. The forest level! The winter level! The…toxic waste level?

Unravel-Admit it: You thought I was kidding.

Admit it: You thought I was kidding.

Two toxic waste levels, actually. Much of Unravel is concerned with—I think—the effects of time on a family, on aging and loss and (possibly) dementia. None of this is especially well-conveyed, but I’m pretty sure that’s what I gleaned from it by the end.

It’s hard to follow though, given the game has barely any structure to it. Story is conveyed, at best, in winks and nudges. Walking through the forest you might suddenly see a ghostly apparition, a man and woman hiking. Later you might see a kid playing in the sand or something.

Imagine looking through the photo albums (or Instagram, for the young’uns) of a total stranger. Or, better yet, imagine looking through a collection of stock photos and trying to assemble a story from them. That’s Unravel.

And we haven’t even talked about those toxic waste environs yet! I was willing to accept Unravel as a soporific, confused trip through a grandma’s photo album, but midway through the game the story takes a turn and focuses on the dangers of nuclear waste or big business or global warming or…I can’t really fathom it, to be honest. All I know is Yarny needs to avoid the massive puddles of radioactive green goo while ghosts of suited businessmen appear briefly in the background.

Unravel-Damn it, Mr. Suit Guy and your loyal construction minions. Think of the yarn-children.

Damn it, Mr. Suit Guy and your loyal construction minions. Think of the yarn-children.

The levels themselves are admittedly beautiful to look at. As with The Vanishing of Ethan Carter I suspect photogrammetry might’ve played a hand, leading to a level of ultra-realism rarely seen in games, let alone small indie titles like this. But they’re empty. They play at life, at emotion, at having “something to say” without really saying much at all.

 

Minecraft: Story Mode review

The latest episodic adventure series from Telltale Games spins a grand adventure in the universe of Minecraft, Mojang’s ever-popular sandbox game. It’s a head-scratching concept: Minecraft has never had a story, of any kind; it’s always been about making your own fun and coming up with your own stories through play. However, Telltale makes the concept work by putting narrative first. I didn’t have much familiarity with Minecraft going into Story Mode, but I got wrapped up in my hero’s journey all the same.

The player character, Jesse, can be male or femaleMinecraft: Story Mode is a much more family-oriented experience than anything in recent memory from Telltale, with the writers building in plenty of goofy moments to lighten the story’s world-in-peril stakes. Story Mode feels like a pastiche of beloved ’80s films: the kids-going-on-an-unsupervised-adventure setup of The Goonies, the self-discovery of Stand by Me; the us-against-the-world feel of The Breakfast Club. There’s also a dollop of Lord of the Rings in the game’s opening episode, “The Order of the Stone” — namely, ordinary people getting caught up in cataclysmic events, complete with a “Breaking of the Fellowship“-esque sequence at the end.

That’s a smart move that opened up Minecraft: Story Mode to me as someone who isn’t exactly a Minecraft fan. Story Mode is kid-friendly but not dumbed down, touching on topics like bullying, historical cover-ups and growing older.

Your party is led by the player character, Jesse, who can be male or female, depending on your choice. Jesse and their friends — loyal meathead Axel and smart, self-confident Olivia, plus Jesse’s pet pig, Reuben — are a talented team of builders hoping to topple the perennial champs at the Minecraft convention EnderCon.

But a series of unfortunate events at EnderCon unleashes a Wither, a terrifying monster that threatens to consume everything in existence. Jesse and company realize they must enlist the help of the Order of the Stone, a group of four fabled heroes. And so the gang sets out on the trail of the legendary adventurers.

The combination of Minecraft: Story Mode‘s influences and its family-friendly nature makes the plot fairly predictable. Rather than the out-of-nowhere twists — e.g., deaths — common in Telltale’s more mature fare, the story turns here are often foreshadowed or outright telegraphed by dialogue and visual cues.

I didn’t mind the genre tropes because there were enough plot developments to keep me interested. As Jesse, I spent enough time with my friends to really get to know them, even in the sub-two-hour runtime of “The Order of the Stone.” I began to care about those characters because I had built relationships with them.

On the other hand, playing Telltale’s adventure games can be frustrating when you’re not just selecting dialogue prompts, and that’s as true as ever in Minecraft: Story Mode. The few instances of timing-based combat in the game are uniformly awful, with sluggish controls that made me spam the attack button in desperation.

minecraft story mode ep 1 tall screen 1

Windows 10 review

Windows 10 is an entirely new version of the veteran Windows operating system – a version that is make-or-break for Microsoft.

Even though Windows 8.1 did improve things, there’s no escaping that with Windows 8, Microsoft was hugely complacent, buoyed by the success of Windows 7. It drastically misunderstood its users with a fundamentally changed user interface which didn’t make any logical sense and was hard to learn. It failed us. It failed itself.

Thankfully 2015 Microsoft is pretty different to 2012 Microsoft. The key management of the corporation has changed. It has woken up to the fact that people can choose other operating systems. It’s keen on making stuff for OS X, Linux, iOS and Android. As you’ll hear, it’s allowing apps from other platforms to be easily ported to Windows, too.

Microsoft believes the future of Windows is as a platform for all. Like Android, the strength of Windows is in the thousands of companies that develop for it (see the section about Universal apps for more on the relationship with developers) and use it in their products.

That’s why Windows 10 is no longer just an operating system for 32 and 64-bit PCs. It will also run on the ARM platform for smaller tablets and smartphones. Windows 10 is going to run on phones – it’s the new version of Windows Phone, but it’s not that clear whether Microsoft will brand new Windows Phones as ‘Windows 10’ or not. If you know what Windows RT was, then don’t worry, because it’s nothing like that.

Universal apps will run not only on PCs, but on Windows 10 phones, Windows 10 for IoT devices and Xbox as well.

Like Windows XP, Vista, 7 and 8 before it, Windows 10 is part of the Windows NT family.

Windows 10 review

From the Windows 10 Preview to RTM

We’ve been part of the Windows Insider program, which has given people early access to Windows 10 through various phases of its development. The latest version, which this article is based on, is known as build 10240, made available on 15 July. It is the RTM- or Release to Manufacturing – version. RTM will also be on Windows 10 PCs.

RTM doesn’t have the usual ‘Windows 10 Insider Preview’ text on the desktop, and it has also been released to everybody in the Windows Insider program – even those who didn’t want the latest updates (the ‘slow’ ring as opposed to the ‘fast’ ring).

Windows 10 review

Even after Windows 10’s release, the Windows Insider program will continue, and Microsoft will release Windows 10 updates to members of the program first.

While it’s natural that Windows 10 will be considered as ‘finished’ by reviewers (us) and consumers in the coming weeks, Microsoft doesn’t subscribe to this point of view, and says it will carry on developing the OS with additional tweaks.



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My name is Sayed Ahmadreza Razian and I am a graduate of the master degree in Artificial intelligence .
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Related topics such as image processing, machine vision, virtual reality, machine learning, data mining, and monitoring systems are my research interests, and I intend to pursue a PhD in one of these fields.

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  • Data mining - Big Data
  • CUDA Programming
  • Game and Virtual reality

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